Use of Space in Christo and Jeanne-Claude Projects

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Use of Space in Christo and Jeanne-Claude Projects

The Christo and Jeanne-Claude Projects refer to a string of environmental artistic projects undertaken by the team of Hristo Vladimirov Yavachev and his wife, Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon. The couple has received a lot of popularity because of their visually impressive and extravagant artistic creations. Part of their recognition also originates from the controversial way in which they remove their artwork after displaying it for a specific duration. After being displayed, all of their works of art are destroyed and recycled. The Gates is one of the artworks in the Christo and Jeanne-Claude projects that consisted of approximately 7.500 vinyl “gates” on a 38-kilometer stretch in New York City. The erection of The Gates elicited mixed reactions from the residents, art lovers, and tourists. A section of them reported that it improved the winter landscape while another group argued that they defaced the city.

The use of space in the placement and construction of The Gate is a very interesting artistic aspect. It was constructed on the Central Park for two main reasons: it was isolated from natural forms and it was located in the middle of a developed city. This isolation is an important aspect since it represented an unused space. In a way, the park could even be considered neglected or misused. Jeanne and Christo sought to initiate a set of activities and materials that could activate the banal space that was Central Park. The two artists particularly focused on exploring inner spaces as opposed to the conventional outers paces addressed by a myriad of artists. The proposal of The Gates paved the way for the “inner space” concept in the 19th century.

The public platform is from the precise conditions that people use, the very public spaces or those owned privately, the state that is a large number of people. It is space utilized by the millions of citizens who go through that space for a very short duration. Jeanne and Christo worked to insert a slight interruption in that space. Consequently, the public takes up everything belonging to the space; they do not invent it. The time factor is a very dominant aspect of The Gates. Jeanne and Christo were very strict on the duration that all their artwork took while in the public domain. In fact, The Umbrellas were the longest standing work of art by the couple. In describing the process of assembling The Gates, the couple stated that speed was the biggest priority. All the gates were attached to a heavy steel base using bolts after which the cover is opened and the fabric is loosened. This rapid process of assembly and deconstruction serves to introduce an element of intrigue, value, and flexibility. The allure is created by the speed. The public notice a certain construction work ongoing, a brief announcement of the display and even before most of the visitors can explore The Gates; it has been demolished and recycled. Furthermore, the authors also make no claim of ownership and this prevents the public from accessing any archived version.

The relationship between space and time is a very close one. When Jeanne and Christo sought out to assemble The Gates, it transformed an idle space into one teeming with interest and creativity. However, without realizing it, the two artists had influence the time aspect. The Gates came up in a location that was considered dead and empty into a valuable place. Now, when people traveled through the park, the aspect of time became irrelevant since something new was included.