Opening Bakery Shop

Opening Bakery Shop

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Institution:

 

Opening Bakery Shop

Production Systems and Procedures

            Fusion Lah! will employ the conventional approach to the making of pastries and giant cupcakes. The decision is hinged on its ability to blend creatively varying ingredients in order to produce a unique flavor whose signature taste will enhance an increase in repeat customers. In fact, this system is preferable because of the freshness of the cupcakes, cruffins, and cronuts thereby providing a rich aroma around the restaurant. It would also be beneficial to dazzle the clients with the gourmet-type of setting (Fullen, 2005). Occasionally, ready-made pastries will be on offer as a means of ensuring fast delivery of food for customers in a hurry. Such items will be carefully wrapped, for hygienic purposes in attractive bags, which will serve as free advertising platforms as well (Lee, 2011). The above desserts will be well cooked, delicious to taste and presented in a stylish manner too. They will follow a regular yet and predictable pattern in accordance with the restaurant’s opening and closing time. For example, Fusion Lah! will be operational from Tuesday to Sunday. Baking of the cronuts, as well as the flavored cream, will be done on the following day in order to simplify the workload and allow proper marinating of the dough.

The scheduling will be as follows:

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
closed cupcake cupcake cupcake cupcake cupcake cupcake
closed cronut   cronut   cronut  

 

Purchasing, Receiving, Storage and Inventory Control Practices

            The purchasing system will preferably be based on the tally created by the Front of House occupants; the cashier in conjunction with the manager. The latter will be specially tasked with monitoring the flour levels as well as other additives and make a daily log of these items in order to have an updated number of “on hand” items present before they reach restock levels. In fact, a weekly vetting of equipment to ascertain they are in good condition will be the norm as well. As such, a proper inventory of the dishes, glassware, office supplies and beverages will be a common feature (Bryce & Wilson, 2002). They too will be accompanied by their respective values, hence a physical inventory system is more applicable to Fusion Lah! Doing so will aid in theft reduction, improvement of accuracy, maintaining product quality, determination of what and when to buy as well as costs (Egerton-Thomas, 2006). The FIFO strategy would suffice too due to the perishability of the goods and the need to maintain high-quality standards. Such inventory would thus be calculated as a value of the actual costs. Varying distribution networks within the state for certain ingredients would require the manager to make regular contacts with such suppliers in advance in order to gain favorable prices and volumes. Sometimes it would be necessary tom open lines of credit although these will be subject to regulations (Wentz, 2007).

Ethical standards would, therefore, be maintained in such circumstances, and the pastry targets/needs of clients will be non-negotiable despite the company being a startup (McGarvey & Hannon, 2004). The items for purchase and the timing for making such a move would be vital hence constant evaluation of stock levels would be done. The manager would thus have the sole authority to decide the volume of minimum orders as well as the amount of pastries made for promotions to penetrate the market (Daniels, 2002). It is noteworthy that loyal customers would benefit greatly from this endeavor. Lead times will be made available to aid in proper planning procedures too. Receiving such items will be another priority whereby communication of delivery times will be made to vendors. Moreover, enough space will have to be available, carts will be well positioned to load and offload the goods, stationing receiving personnel in the appropriate areas and an official document confirming the receipt of such foodstuffs will be there too. Counterchecking against purchasing orders as well as delivery invoices to verify the items and their prices will also be done while their movement to storage areas will be carefully monitored to avoid breakages or even loss (Fields, 2007). Upon storage, rotation may be allowed but such a decision would be left to the manager. It is, however, imperative that the storage area would be a cool and dry place to reduce the risk of perishability, and such places will be secured by him/her too. Inventory control would thus be maintained.

Human Resource Practices

Two bakers, as well as two assistants, would be positioned at the BOH while one cashier and a single manager would man the FOH. Whereas the assistants would be part-timers tasked with helping in the cleaning of dishes and complimentary services, the rest will be on a permanent basis with contractual agreements illustrating specific incentives for their roles. The use of social media, especially Facebook will be a vital tool for recruitment due to its widespread use and relatively cheap cost. It would also double as a marketing forum whereupon new clients can gain information about Fusion Lah! as well as a source of feedback from them. As such, an emphasis on a rigorous training program for the employees would be the focus of the firm to streamline operations to meet best standard practices (Abrams, 2003). For example, basic etiquette, meal presentation, grooming and socializing are some of the courses that will be tutored to help their interactions with a diverse group of customers.

 

References

Abrams, R. M. (2003). The Successful Business Plan: Secrets & Strategies. Palto Alto, Calif: Planning Shop.

Bryce, A., & Wilson, J. (2002). Business Management for Standard Grade. Oxford: Heinemann.

Daniels, P. (2002). Restaurant Business Start-up Guide: A complete guide to establishing your Business. Chino Hills, Calif: Venture Marketing.

Egerton-Thomas, C. (2006). How to open and run a Successful Restaurant. Hoboken, N.J: John Wiley & Sons.

Fields, R. (2007). Restaurant Success, by the numbers: A money-guy’s guide to opening the next new hot spot. Berkeley, Calif: Ten Speed Press.

Fullen, S. L. (2005). Opening a Restaurant or other food Business Starter kit: How to prepare a restaurant Business Plan & Feasibility Study: with companion CD-ROM. Ocala, Fla: Atlantic Pub. Group.

Lee, R. (2011). The everything guide to starting and running a Restaurant: The Ultimate Resource for starting a Successful Restaurant! Avon, Mass: Adams Media.

McGarvey, B., & Hannon, B. M. (2004). Dynamic Modeling for Business Management: An Introduction. New York: Springer.

Wentz, B. (2007). Food service Management: How to Succeed in the High-risk Restaurant Business– by someone who did.

 

 

 

 

Journal Entry Two

Journal Entry Two

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Journal Entry Two

SWOT Analysis

One of the prime strengths of the Public Health sector is the increased fiscal resources released by the central government. The monetary resources go to improve resource acquisition and distribution resulting in overall improvements in health care quality (Louis, 2014). There are also the various reforms that promote equity and solidarity across different health departments. In this, there are greater levels of standardization and shared best practices.

However, there continued to be the weaknesses in group marginalization and denied access to insurance services. For instance, the American system records more African American and Hispanic casualties when compared to White due to lack of quality health care (Louis, 2014). For the same marginalized groups, there is unstable financing meaning mitigated resource distribution. Marginalization equally increases conflict in the work setting given modern doctrines in public health champion for workforce diversity regarding backgrounds, beliefs, and values.

Many of the limitations can be resolved through reforms in health service delivery and organizational management facilitated through transformational leadership. Policy makers, managers, and corporate leaders require a better understanding of the health engine to incorporate suitable incentive strategies, improve resource distribution, and overall service quality (Louis, 2014).

However, slow infrastructure development and aging workforces put positive progression at risk of work slowdowns or complete termination in adverse cases. Moreover, the present global economy has elevated demographic dynamicity and its associative implications on health care (Louis, 2014). Health care providers need to perform frequent evaluations of the patient populations meaning elevated operational costs.

Required Talents and Qualities in Team Selection

Present scholarly literature in Human Resource Management (HRM) teaches that hiring of the best employees is not sufficient for overall team strength (Sutcliffe, 2013). An organization has to incorporate strategic education and training of the acquired workforce. However, these are the initial basic competencies that I would apply to source team members.

Communication Skills

Proficiency in communication is imperative in each team member. The competency must be exhibited in both oral and written form. Secondly, the team member needs to highlight superior listening, consideration and speaking up attributes about communication (Sutcliffe, 2013). Under such, the employee does not shy from making relevant points or criticizing ineffective practices.

Leadership Skills

Team members that depict the quality of leadership are beneficial to overall productivity as they highlight the ability to perform with little or no supervision. Moreover, the competency means the employee is able to make decisions and stand by them (Sutcliffe, 2013). In this, they can motivate fellow employees to perform equally better.

Intelligence

Intelligence is a cognitive attribute that extends beyond book-acquired knowledge. The intelligent team member is street smart, sensitive and of high integrity (Sutcliffe, 2013). Intelligence is a beneficial quality in problematic situations that require rapid response.

People Skills

People skills in an employee mean that the individual is able to operate in a team environment with minimal conflict. The individual does not shy away from volunteer activities, extra social responsibility, or learning opportunities meaning an elevated rate of gaining experience. People skills mean the team member can evaluate problems, its solutions, alternatives, and put in place the most utilitarian response mechanism (Sutcliffe, 2013). In meaning, the individual always operates under the criterion to effect or maximize social good.

Technical Competencies

Technical competencies refer to expertise revolving around process automation and hand operations. Employees with technical skills exhibit superior reasoning and rationale attributes (Sutcliffe, 2013). In this, the entire team benefits from improved problems solving capabilities. The individual acts as a mechanical problem solver.

Importance of the Talents and Qualities

The main objective of using the various skills and talents in team selection was to ascertain that the acquired group exhibits cultural and behavioral diversity. Variance in personalities is crucial to management as it improves system flexibility when managed appropriately. Team diversity facilitates self-supervision and critique of poor team member and manager behaviors. Employees need to understand the manager’s leadership style and complement it instead of duplicate it (Richards, 2013). In this, there is balance in the establishment of organizational values and culture that goes to determine overall performance.

Intelligence is crucial in establishing team autonomy, tenacity and tactical capabilities (Richards, 2013). The degree of sensitivity in intelligent employees enables them to consider and understand cultural divergences across the team facilitating healthy interactions. Tolerance ascertains operational continuity even in the event of failure, as team members are not easily discouraged. When a tactical capability is combined with technical skills, there is improved service quality because of strategic and maximized application of machines (Richards, 2013). In this, the team also benefits from lower operational expenses through fewer team members and time used per activity.

Communication and people skills combine in the development of healthy relationships between team members, which extend beyond the workplace setting. Healthy relationships are beneficial as they improve operational flexibility, workflow, and conflict resolution capacities (Richards, 2013). Employees depict trust and loyalty amongst each other and to the team improving organizational commitment and work motivation (Richards, 2013). Despite communication ascertain role clarity, relationships mean employees have some degree of interchangeability. This is elevated in turn by leadership skills, which improve adaptability.

 

 

 

References

Louis, R. (2014). Public Health Leadership: Putting Principles into Practice, (3rd Edition). Burlington, MA: Jones & Barlett Learning.

Richards, David. (2013). Competent Team Members. Gotten from Building Effective Teams. Organizational Development Portal. Retrieved From http://www.odportal.com/teams/effective/chapter7.htm

Sutcliffe, J. (2013). The Eight Qualities of Successful School Leaders: The Desert Island School Challenge. Burlington, MA: Jones & Barlett Learning.

Questions

Questions

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Questions

Part I

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) refers to the value of services and goods produced in a country over a given period. In addition, the amount is arrived at by evaluation of the figures realized by a country in terms of income and expenditure. The expenditure method applies to Country A. The initial GDP figure is $150, 000 that refers to the 100,000 in the production of cars and 50,000 accrued from importing extra vehicles. Secondly, the income method is used whereby the GDP is at $190,000, which is accruable from the purchase of vehicles worth 90,000 whereby 25,000 for police officers, 10,000 by companies, and 65,000 from exports. GDP is at 50% whereby 50,000 accounts for imported goods, whereas 100,000 accounts for goods produced in the country (Sloman & Sutcliffe, 2002). The GDP per capita is arrived at by dividing the GDP by the population that provides 340,000 and per capita of 0.68. In relation to Keynesian economics, it is evident that the state is unable to produce goods for local consumption. The presence of the government enhances efficiency and money supply that induces economic growth.

Part II

It is evident that the state is unable to produce goods for local consumption. The presence of the government enhances efficiency and money supply that induces economic growth. The United States can be termed as experiencing a slowdown in economic activity because of reduction in the export of commodities into foreign markets .furthermore; this is also attributable to an increase n the number of imports from neighboring states. Moreover, reducing the incidence of unemployment and increasing exports would play a critical role in improving the state of the American economy (Hubbard & O’Brien, 2008).

References

Hubbard, R. G., & O’Brien, A. P. (2008). Economics. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Sloman, J., & Sutcliffe, M. (2002). Economics. Harlow, England: Prentice Hall/Financial Times.

Reflection Paper

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Reflection Paper

Knowledge

The painting depicts the face of a woman drawn in bright, bold colors. The painting appears to have been drawn using acrylics, as shown by the thick and smooth texture of the paint after it dries. Around the woman’s face are contrasting and flowing patterns of flowers. The predominant color used is different shades of green, ranging from emerald to jungle green. Towards the edges of the painting, the dominant color is amber, which brings out the contrast with the face and flowery patterns in the middle of the painting.

Understanding

The concept of the page is to evaluate the painting in detail to establish the symbolism, background, and meaning of it through drawing from the inspiration of the artist. The purpose of the artwork is to communicate emotions through the series of contrasting elements provided.

Analysis

The artwork under study is used to draw elements of my book. On the first part, the book will cover the main theme. The second part will discuss the elements of design employed such as the texture, contrast, balance, dominance, and harmony. The third part will encompass the reflective inspiration drawn from it, such as the subtle messages communicated to the audience by the artist.

Evaluation

In my opinion, the artwork presented was an excellent project, which helped me draw inspiration from it. Aside from the creativity incorporated in the work, I believe that the artist behind the painting wished for people to draw inspiration from his completed work, just as they drew inspiration.

Synthesis and Application

I would be able to create my book differently if there was more information concerning the painting provided. Furthermore, I would be able to draw more information from different people, and this could be achieved through open discussions about the painting with fellow students. I would, therefore, take a more open-minded approach to evaluating the painting both in its physical and symbolic meaning.

Personal Nursing Philosophy

Personal Nursing Philosophy

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Institution:

 

Personal Nursing Philosophy

A personal nursing philosophy comprises of reflections of an individual’s viewpoints, ideology, and values concerning the practice. My individual philosophy commenced with an effort to explain the questions concerning the significance of nursing in my life. Another incessant thought in my head has been to know the guiding aspects in my practice. Before I can successfully identify my personal nursing philosophy, it is imperative to tackle some of the nursing process, the four meta-paradigms of nursing, and the major notions of my theory. The conclusive section of the essay will cover the practical implementation of my philosophy in the current nursing practice, studies, and education.

Key Concepts of my Nursing Philosophy

This particular philosophy is exemplified by all-round, compassionate, and racially conscious care to all the patients and the extended family. For a nurse, it is imperative that I protect the interests of different parties including the patient, healthcare provider, instructor, director, and leader since I think that people in my profession are obligated to offer the best quality nursing care in order with the intention of realizing different patient outcomes. Personally, I perceive nursing as comprised of care and attempting to comprehend human beings on different planes including scientific, physical, and emotional. In a professional capacity, I feel a special obligation toward a lifetime of studying, combining both formal learning methods and practical experiences to improve my nursing skills and knowledge.

Meta-paradigms Concepts

My nursing philosophy organizes the nursing profession using four meta-paradigms concepts: health, environment, person, and nursing. I consider the nursing profession to be one that is centered on human beings. Caring extends beyond dealing with the particular illness to include the welfare of the actual patient. This comprehensive perspective evaluates all the areas of a patient’s life and initiates the finest quality of life for the patients. Even though human beings are the focus of nursing, it is essential to investigate beyond the patient to the setting in which they reside. This is vital since humans coexist in a larger community with different elements and features that determine the state of the patients. It is relatively difficult to detach patients from their surroundings because they are interconnected. I believe that personal health is very volatile and works in a continuum that shifts depending on the environmental factors. I am employed in an institution where I regularly meet patients that have been traumatized or those that are suffering from physical and cognitive health complications. Finally, I think that nursing entails encountering individual patients or groups and being consumed in the current. Daily, nurses witness different situations that demand professional competence to make accurate conclusions concerning a patient’s situation, for instance, placing meaning on aspects that can be sensed, seen, heard, imagined, smelled, or touched when they interact with patients. Nurses are actively involved in the process of creating evocative relationships.

The Nursing Process

The process of nursing applies a comprehensive, patient-centered care and problem-solving approach when dealing with patients and their extended family. Every individual has different demands, and thus wants a different strategy. Care should be designed based on the individual person involved, and this is why the nursing process is important. This arrangement assists nurses in creating a plan that will contain the demands of patients. Most people wrongly presume that nurses work with individuals strictly and in the process, forget that nurses also have the duty to assist families and other community members. We can offer direct care to these patients, and implement indirect care to the rest of the community. Nurses play a major role in dealing with each patient’s precise needs. The first stage in providing nursing care is an evaluation. This is a methodical and flexible way to gather and analyze data concerning the patient. The next stage is conducting the nursing diagnosis to obtain the nurse’s clinical opinion concerning the possible health conditions. The diagnosis shows not only that the patient is hurting but that the problem has triggered other complications, for instance, apprehension, malnutrition, and conflict among the family members, or has the possibility of causing new problems, for example, respiratory diseases create new issues for the immobilized patient. The analysis is the foundation for the nurse’s care plan. The third stage is dependent on the evaluation and diagnosis. The nurse sets quantifiable and feasible short- and long-term objectives for this patient that include relocating to different locations, at least, four times daily; maintaining a proper diet by consuming lesser and repeated meals; solving conflicts through therapy, or limiting pain through sufficient medication. The last stage is implementation. Nursing care is executed based on the care plan. Therefore, continuity of care for the patient at the time of hospitalization and in preparation for release needs to be guaranteed. Lastly, assessment finishes this process. Both the patient’s condition and the success of the nursing care must be constantly evaluated, and the care plan altered where necessary.

Application to Current Nursing Practice

I have always believed that I am sympathetic and caring. In the nursing vocation, one has to possess a massive amount of empathy and thoughtful for their patients and their relatives. A nurse is not only taking care of the patient’s physical condition as well as their emotional requirements. For instance, I work on a surgical floor where occasionally I care for chronically ill individuals where numerous complex emotional issues that need to be acknowledged and addressed by a practitioner. I discovered that these patients, after creating a relationship and trust, are the more modest and orderly patients with whom to work. Most of my time as a nurse is spent communicating with them on matters concerning life and their hobbies. Though I am still caring for their medical needs, I am helping them psychologically on nearly all of these occasions. For me to succeed in this kind of nursing, I must have understanding and sympathy. Additionally, I have to take a detailed inspection at our society and the major health care problems we are experiencing. It is imperative that I investigate about health complications that our patients are experiencing. The most important causes of mortality in the United States are diseases caused by lifestyle choices. I have to ponder on the welfare of the population, rather than focusing on a treatment-centered approach at the higher levels. In the event that the nursing fraternity is successful in promoting health sensitization, then as a nurse, I am doing my job to the best of my abilities.

Conclusion

As the process of nursing moves into the 21st century, there is a proposal that continued existence and progression of the discipline demand increased the commitment to practicing nurses in using and developing exclusively nursing knowledge. Possibly a starting point may be creating an individual personal nursing philosophy that concentrates on areas unique to nursing as this allows reflection on comprehending relationships between personal philosophical ideas as concerned with present issues in the field. The objective of this essay was to talk about each aspect of my personal nursing philosophy. In particular, how I developed my beliefs, how I experienced each in my practice and how each contributes towards my personal contribution to nursing.

Article Review

Article Review

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Article Review

Ruth Bleasdale, a professor at the department of history at Dalhousie University, wrote the article titled “Class Conflict on the Canals of Upper Canada in the 1840s.” The article discusses the way in which Irish laborers on the St. Lawrence canal system had introduced a way of life guided by class relations. Class conflict, inseparably intertwined with racial detestation and prejudice, had created in the southern Irish people mistrust and disgust of employers, doubt of the regulations and the administration, and a readiness to breach the law to realize their objectives (Johnson & Wilson, 1991). This bitter cultural history influenced the Irish workers’ opposition to circumstances in Canada and gave a unique structure to class tensions on the canals. With exceptional laws, special law enforcement teams, and a military ready to assist, the Canadian government assembled the authoritative power of the state against the laborers. Bleasdale noted that the government was unsuccessful in stifling labor strife and averting strike action. Many officers and contractors embraced this failure as evidence of the Celt’s uncontrollable nature (Johnson & Wilson, 1991).

Bleasdale manages to organize the paper in a proper way using clear and well-structured language. She summarizes the way in which the workers evaluated the labor situation in Canada, the consequent government reaction and final status quo achieved by the resistance. Ruth’s title was informative and offered a wealth of information on the significance of the labor resistance in shaping Canadian history. By illustrating the determined efforts of the Irish workers in the canals, the author was able to bring out the continued struggles and challenges that they faced (MacDowell, & Radforth, 2006). Bleasdale included the experiences of the canallers while they were defending their faith. It was imperative for these struggles to be highlighted in detail as they form the backbone of the account (Johnson, & Wilson, 1991). In Canadian history, foreign workers have been racially labeled, discriminated against, and exposed to discouraging levels of reception in most regions and the proletariat. This category of employees ended up experiencing different levels of suffering when they arrived in Canada (MacDowell & Radforth, 2006). This included being taken advantage of by employers, ignored by industrial representatives, and subjugated as mediocre citizens by the state. While many analysts argue that this reaction was in line with the abrasive reception of foreigners across Europe and the rest of the new world, there is enough evidence that points towards the sluggish pace of embracing and tolerating other races within Canada. This is far from the ideal image that Canada is interested in showing the rest of the international community (Johnson & Wilson, 1991).

The mistreatment of foreigners points towards deeper injustices perpetrated against the Irish immigrants. Bleasdale’s work has a solid place in academic literature particularly for those studying Canadian history and even international relations. The chapter examines the conditions that created the permanent wage labor in Canada and the diverse ways through which that experience has been perpetuated by employing from new groups of labor, restructuring the labor sector, and embracing innovation (MacDowell, & Radforth, 2006). Specific attention should be given to the variety of reactions wage earners experienced after they made a claim concerning paid work, stratification according to ability, gender, and race (Johnson & Wilson, 1991). Other areas that have also intrigued analysts include the concerted efforts of different state machinery to ensure that the middle and lower class uprisings were quashed. The efforts of this particular social class can easily be mentioned in the discussions on class struggle and find a place in the explanation of other social class theories such as Marxism.

 

References

Top of Form

Top of Form

Johnson, J. K., & Wilson, B. G. (1991). Historical essays on Upper Canada: New perspectives. Ottawa, Canada: Carleton University Press.

MacDowell, L. S., & Radforth, I. W. (2006). Canadian working-class history: Selected readings. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Bottom of Form

 

Bottom of Form

 

Medication

Medication

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Institution:

 

Medication

Question 1

The information from the commercial matched in closeness to the medication learnt from the book especially in terms of the administration, the pronunciation, and the content delivery of the composition. In the commercial, the content lacked the pharmacokinetics indication in regards to the distribution and protein binding. The structural percentage of the guided profile required in the patient’s uptake was also lacking due to the period allocated for the commercial in review (Deglin and Vallerand, 2013). On the other hand, actual manufacturer’s advertising showed the inaugural and logical steps for patient use when in peak duration as well as onset determination and the route to be followed. It lacked in the book, as it required pictorial development for guidance as opposed to oral delivery.

Question 2

The immediate capture from the commercial delivery was the ease of explanation used with the combination of sound, directions, as well as images necessary for the distinction of the medication. It was timely with the correspondent use as per the directions given for treatment and included the pictorial ease. The commercial was also brief and clear without the necessary large and detailed indication of the scientific terms associated with the medication. As opposed to the directives relayed when sought from on the counter purchase, the commercial lacked the authority especially in dealing with the impairment it can cause or the severe inhibitors in the process.

Question 3

The commercial would influence me to use the drug when the need arises since the directions are easy and according to the delivery as it is safe as opposed to alternatives. The indication of the possible inhibitors and impairment in the process are positive to me as a patient, and I can use it for effective treatment over a length of time. However, it also reduces chances of me using it, as it does not detail the chances of interactions with possible challenges to the boy’s response, depending on the optimal levels of effectiveness. Similarly, the price is not friendly when used from availability sources in the pharmacies.

Question 4

Some of the internet usage over the textbook indications included the speed of delivery, easiness to understand as well as pictorial effectiveness. The time used in delivering the commercial makes it easy for users to relate to the medication and intake it with relative ease. It is also simple to follow the directives for dosage, time durations, possible indications, as well as graphical representation of the distinctions. The patient can depend on the commercial to articulate the necessary inhibitors as well as reporting possible alterations encountered while administering the dosage (Suvorexant Drug, 2015). The internet media also enhances the experience with the background accompaniment of music and interaction between the user and official directives.

Question 5

I would recommend the commercial as part of the teaching plan for a person since there is a clear connection between the theoretical pharmacokinetics and the implementation of the patient’s use. From the book, it is a monotonous detail of the content and composition, which can make it unappealing to the patient when trying to understand. Therefore, the commercial makes it easier to relate to the details as well as directions for use with an entertainment value created. The commercial helps in making the person get interactive and curious as to various inhibitors that can arise from the medication use and possible diagnoses and desired outcomes in the process.

 

References

Deglin, J. H., & Vallerand, A. H. (2013). Davis’s drug guide for nurses. Davis’s Drug Guide/Suvorexant. Retrieved from http://www.drugguide.com/ddo/view/Davis-Drug-Guide/110185/all/suvorexant?q=Belsomra&ti=0

Suvorexant Drug. (2015). Suvorexant Commercial. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kMzVNnv78w  

 

WELL INTEGRITY

WELL INTEGRITY

by (Name)

 

 

Course:

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Date:

 

In simple terms, well integrity can be described as an application, which provides organizational, operational, and technical solutions that are effective in curtailing release of fluids to the surface or subterranean formations from the well (Bellarby 2009, p. 14). It is considered as a multifaceted approach on managing well leakages and well barrier management (Alcantara 2014, p. 55). The role of a well integrity engineer is to interact with various aspects and disciplines consistently. This ensures their empowerment with the skills on well barrier envelopes and well barriers management (Vignes & Aadnøy 2010, p. 32). As elaborated, well integrity is characterized with different affects that outlines the roles of the well integrity engineer.

The first facet that is relevant in maintaining well integrity is accountability. It is imperative for the engineer to maintain accountability as it assures that all the responsibilities whose completion synchronizes with the well integrity assurance are fulfilled (Carpenter 2015, p. 45). From this angle, other additional personnel are also deemed accountable. They include the well service technicians as well as the operators (Matanovic, Gaurina-Medimurec & Simon 2013, p. 56). The second facet is well operating processes. Some of the fundamental processes include procedures to report anomalies, well startup and operational shutdown processes as well as corrosion control and personnel competency. This facet ensures that all the aforementioned processes are coordinated simultaneously.

The third facet involves well service processes. This is usually handled by the well integrity management systems abbreviated as WIMS (Oksta & Sangesland, 2009, p. 21). Through provision of meaningful solutions, engineers are able to fulfill the service processes, which include intervention procedures and competency. The fourth facet handled by the WIMS is the annulus/tubing integrity (Dethlefs & Chastain, 2012, p. 89). This involves the maintaining the integrity of the production tubing. Elements that contribute to the destruction of the tubing include corrosion and erosion that is caused by the production fluid. It is imperative for the personnel and engineers to ensure that the tubes are well monitored and maintained.

 

References

Alcantara, S, O 2014, ‘Technology Focus: Well Integrity (January 2014)’, Journal of Petroleum Technology, vol. 66 no. 01, pp.90-90.

Bellarby, J 2009, Well completion design, Elsevier, Amsterdam.

Carpenter, C 2015, ‘Effective Well-Integrity Management in a Mature Sour-Oil Field’, Journal of Petroleum Technology, vol. 67 no. 01, pp.93-96.

Dethlefs, J,  & Chastain, B 2012 ‘Assessing Well-Integrity Risk: A Qualitative Model’, SPE Drilling & Completion, vol. 27 no. 02, pp.294-302.

Matanović, D, Čikeš, M, & Moslavac, B 2012, Sand control in well construction and operation, Springer, Berlin.

Matanovic, D, Gaurina-Medimurec, N, & Simon, K 2013, Risk analysis for prevention of hazardous situations in petroleum and natural gas engineering. Springer, Berlin

Okstad, E. & Sangesland, S 2009, ‘Integrity Assessment of Well Barriers Threatened by Increasing Casing-Hanger Loads’, SPE Drilling & Completion, vol. 24, no. 02, pp.286-292.

Vignes, B, & Aadnøy, B 2010, Well-Integrity Issues Offshore Norway. SPE Production & Operations, vol. 25 no. 02, pp.145-150.

The Brain in a Vat Argument

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The Brain in a Vat Argument

The ‘brain in a vat argument’ posits the question: how is it possible to know if one is not, for instance, a brain in a vat being tricked by popular figures. If it is difficult to know this, subsequently how can one have an understanding of the external world? The objective of the essay is to explicate this problem in its clearest form, and consequently, illustrate the way in which it can be resolved. The conclusion will contain a statement affirming that people are fully aware that they are not a brain in a vat. It will also reaffirm the claim that humans have the knowledge of numerous things about the universe (Brueckner, and Ebbs 78). However, this first section tackles the skeptical issue. Visualize a human brain in a vat, connected with the common array of cables and wires. These gadgets and equipment are meant to replenish nutrients and other vitals, maintaining life and strength. The devices monitor any sensory input, and for observing the brain’s efforts to shift its body.

All of these gadgets are connected to a computer that transforms the brain’s experiences into realistic images. Therefore, the brain sees itself as being contained in a normal body. It seems relatively imprudent to believe this BIV hypothesis. People have no reason to think of such things. However, it is tough to determine the authenticity of the BIV hypothesis (Brueckner, and Ebbs 23). One can never be certain about the fact that their brain in a vat or not. The issue is that people’s experiences show all indications that their brains could be in a vat. Certainly, there is a slight difference in the experiences of an ordinary person and that of a brain in a vat. Therefore, even after assuming that a person is not a brain in a vat, it appears difficult to prove that the BIV hypothesis is false. Regrettably, the majority of all people’s beliefs about the universe are grounded on the supposition that the BIV hypothesis is false. The term “universe” is used to represent the world outside the mind of the human being. Therefore, for instance, one strongly believes that his mother is existent (Brueckner, and Ebbs 12).

However, if the person were merely a brain in a vat, then their mother ceases to be real. Consequently, one’s convictions that their mother is existent are formed on the assumption that their entire body is not just a brain in a vat. In the same way, people have their beliefs that the book is white, that their things are exactly where they were placed, that Donald Trump is a man or that a cow is eating grass. It is imperative to reiterate that these and other categories of beliefs are grounded on the assumption that an individual is not a brain in a vat. Therefore, if an individual cannot establish if the BIV hypothesis is false, then it emerges that one cannot easily affirm any of the beliefs about the universe. There is a critical aspect concerning the issue of universe skepticism. An analyst may be left with that nagging feeling that the issue of “brain-in-a-vat” has not really been solved. If this is the case, I believe this occurs because of a mix-up of two diverse issues (Brueckner, and Ebbs 45). The initial one is epistemological in nature. How is it possible to react to the skeptic who debates that one is unaware of anything concerning the universe? To find a solution to this problem, it is necessary to find grounds to discard a single premise of the BIV argument.

Russell’s Response

Bertrand Russell offered an excellent response to the “the brain in a vat” argument that was hinged on three major assumptions. One of Bertrand’s assumptions was that when the experts had conceded, the opposing opinion could not be deemed as certain. The opinions of professionals, when undisputed, ought to be accepted by non-professionals as having a higher possibility of being right compared to the contradictory opinion. The other skepticisms that Russell proposed include that on occasions when they are not in consensus, non-professional cannot consider any opinion as certain. The last skepticism was that in instances where they all agreed that they lacked a convincing reason to conclude that a positive view existed, the non-expert would be well placed to put his judgment on hold. In his essay entitled “On the Value of Skepticism,” Russell noted that the “…these propositions may seem mild, yet, if accepted, they would absolutely revolutionize human life” (Brueckner, and Ebbs 67). “The opinions for which people are willing to fight and persecute all belong to one of the three classes which this skepticism condemns.” Russell assumed that all facts were eventually originated from human sensory organs of the universe around man. Individual observation, though, is effortlessly influenced and susceptible to flaws (Searle 56). If three people having a different perception look at the same object, there is a high possibility that each person will perceive the same object differently. Making any changes to the object will have the effect of invoking another different perception. This creates the need for the difference to be made between facades and truth.

 

Works Cited

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Brueckner, Anthony, and Gary Ebbs. Debating Self-Knowledge. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Print.

Searle, John R. Seeing Things As They Are: A Theory of Perception. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2015. Print.

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Signature and Modus Operandi

Signature and Modus Operandi

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Signature and Modus Operandi

Varieties of aspects related to forensic psychology are utilized in the identification of suspected individuals in violent crimes in police investigations. Some of the primary aspects of identifiable and measurable criminal behavior in forensic behavioral analyses are offender signature and modus operandi. Hazelwood and Warren (2004) note that all criminals engaged in crime usually have modus operandi that is made up of habits, techniques, and peculiarities in their behavior which are executed with three primary objectives namely completion of the criminal act, affect escape and avoid investigation and capture. On the other hand, offender signature is categorized as either signature behavior or aspect. Offender signature provides a definition of the motive or theme of a criminal offense. The two approaches have been effective in providing criminal justice officials with the capacity for categorization and identification of suspects in criminal activities.

Hazelwood and Warren (2004) utilize behavioral analyses, in what they term as linkage analysis, to identify sexual crimes, which are committed by a single offender. They note that linkage analyses usually evaluates the behavior inherent in the three components that make up a crime namely modus operandi, fantasy based behavior or rituals and signature which is combination of unique behaviors. They described linkage analysis as a process that focuses on collection of varied and detailed information that selects significant features in a crime. Woodhams and Labuschagne (2007) also explore case linkages as part of behavioral analyses in criminal activities. Schlesinger et al (2010) provide a discussion of signature and rituals, whereby they claim that the two are repetitive and fantasy-driven crime behaviors prevalent across sexual homicides.

In essence, there is a common challenge in differentiation of modus operandi against offender signature, which arises from the consideration that specific offender actions may satisfy the categorization of both offender signature and modus operandi. The strategy towards determination of the type of behavior that should be classified into a specific category is reliant on the totality of the context that encapsulates an offense. For example, a rapist may be able to cover his face. However, the act could be modus operandi behavior as he seeks to conceal his identity. In addition, such an act may be classifiable as offender signature in that covering the face, the offender enhances the sexual pleasure accruable from the crime.

Furthermore, I profiling a bank robber or burglar who conceals his face, an investigator could assume such an action as a modus operandi given that concealing identity is critical towards execution of the crime without being arrested. Differentiation between offender behavior and modus operandi in other crimes is relatively easy and straightforward. Thus, in using case linkage, criminal justice professionals are able to identify and correlate elements of a crime with the objective is apprehending a criminal. Critics have also noted that it is possible to have two or more offenders who have similar signature behavior and modus operandi in one geographical area at a given time. Thus, it is critical for professionals to undertake effective analyses of the role of circumstances related to an offense to make accurate determinations in relation to the classification of such behaviors.

In essence, case linkages, may be effective in identification of the patterns of crime and undertaking subsequent classifications for accurate profiling of a criminal. In addition, further profiling can be undertaken with the aim of narrowing the pool of suspects and establishing legal charges against an offender. Thus, it is critical to make use of the growing body of knowledge and skills in behavioral analyses to ensure that justice is dispended fairly for both victims and suspects.

 

References

Hazelwood, R. R., & Warren, J.I. (2004). Linkage analysis: modus operandi, ritual, and signature in serial sexual crime. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 9: 307-318

Woodhams, J. & Labuschagne, G. (2012). A test of case linkage principles with solve and unsolved serial rapes. Journal of Police Criminal Psychology, 27: 85-98.

Schlesinger, B.L., Kassen, M., Mesa, V., & Pinizzotto, J. A. (2010). Ritual and signature in serial sexual homicide. J Am Acad Psychiatry Law, 38: 239-246.