Reflections on Entering the Service of Nursing

 

Reflections on Entering the Service of Nursing

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Reflections on Entering the Service of Nursing

The Jesuit approach towards life has a massive influence on how they conduct their business in different sectors including education and healthcare. Within the education sector specifically, the Jesuits has instituted a longstanding tradition that involves numerous principles and regulations. All the relevant areas including research, service, and personal life are expected to be guided by a belief concerning the sacred nature of all existence, the respect for every human being, and the duty to support the disabled of underprivileged in the world (Combs, 2013). This paper focuses on the adoption of the Jesuit ideology within Loyola University, Chicago. Two major tasks will be carried out. One is analyzing the different aspects of learning and life under the Jesuit pedagogy and two, relating the Jesuit principles to personal situation, characteristics, and make conclusions afterwards.

Ideas, Concerns, and Expectations

Personally, I feel that becoming a nurse under the Jesuit way of life is far more demanding and fulfilling in the long term. The nursing profession perceives service as one of its top objectives. All nurses are expected to serve the patients to the best of their abilities. Adopting a working policy that stresses on service above everything holds the potential to improve the quality and speed of nursing in healthcare institutions. The amount of workload for nurses is one of the highest compared to other healthcare personnel within the institution such as administrators, pharmacists and even janitors. Nurses are normally called upon to work longer hours and in stressful conditions. Working as a nurse under the Jesuit context implies stringent regulations and more principles to follow.

I was already content with dealing with the ordinary issues that underpin the professional nursing environment. However, introducing a new aspect of Jesuit principles creates the need for further orientation and briefing. This is for several reasons. One, I will have to revise my understanding of moral responsibility. Currently, the way I see moral conduct is acting in a way that preserves the life of patient as well as maintaining peace and order in the institution. However, I feel concerned taking up membership with the profession since the Jesuit description of moral responsibility demand very much more. It notes that the current generation has failed to identify and deter wrongdoing within the institutions. It demands that every individual should desist from being silent and complacent with such conditions. I feel that this calls for me to be more than a regular nurse. It creates new responsibilities such as rectifying institutional and personal wrongs as well as exposing unethical conduct within the working and personal environment.

Strengths and Contribution to Enforcing Standards

Nurses and other healthcare personnel are guided by the social contract. This contract dictates that the society extends the healthcare profession power over functions necessary to itself and allows them substantial independence in the execution of their regular affairs. Conversely, the healthcare fraternity is expected to carry itself conscientiously and constantly protect the needs of the public. Some of the assumptions in such a contract are self-regulation as well as maintaining high quality in service provision. It is the genuine stamp of the established profession. One of my strengths is a predisposition towards realizing justice and fairness within the society. I have realized that I have a strong urge to rectify social injustices that may include anything from wrongful governance to unfair allocation of resources. I felt that this quality can be very useful in the nursing profession. I am fully aware of the social contract between nursing and the society. This contract offers us nurses the leeway to administer our duties without much interference in return for increased accountability and ethical conduct on our part. Another one of my strengths is compliance with the administration. I have a deep respect for the healthcare profession. Consequently, I know that I would be willing and able to comply with all the institution regulations as well as the code of ethics. Most healthcare personnel violate the regulations laid down by the industry regulators and this has adverse effects on the patients that may culminate in death or permanent physical or mental damage. These consequences oppose the very reason for joining the profession (Oermann, & Gaberson¸2014).

Conclusion

The violation of the social contract between nursing and society is a major issue that has eroded the efforts of many years and people. The Jesuit way of prioritizing moral responsibility, service, and self-appropriation over other aspects has contributed greatly towards restoring integrity and faith in the healthcare system. Nurses, physicians, and other healthcare personnel are expected to maintain high levels of ethical behavior in the process of delivering their services. Sadly, this is not the case in the current environment. Most healthcare institutions are prioritizing financial gain over provision o vital healthcare services (Oermann, & Gaberson¸2014). This has made access to healthcare expensive for the middle and low class. It is imperative for every relevant stakeholder to revise heir approach towards providing healthcare. Their proposed solutions should include elements found in the Jesuit ideology that focuses on morality and excellent service provision. In this way, sanity can be restored to the industry.

 

References

Combs, M. B. (2013). Transforming ourselves, transforming the world: Justice in Jesuit higher education. New York: Fordham University Press.

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Oermann, M. H., & Gaberson, K. B. (2014). Evaluation and testing in nursing education. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

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Role of Woman and Femininity

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Role of Woman and Femininity

Declarations of the Perfected is a complete translation of the Zhengao, a publication that set the stage for the highlights of medieval Daoism. The first section of this volume focuses on the tradition of realizing spiritual unification, a religious similarity of sexual interaction with Perfected partners. The text is the first to study in detail the complete process of this tradition from initial courtship to the technicalities of the enactment of spiritual union, the development of the Perfected embryo in the body of the expert, and ultimately, the adept’s reincarnation. The following sections will analyze the way in which men and women related in traditional China.

Given that Daoism is a multifaceted tradition that has been around for over 2,500 years, there has been a wide disparity in the way the society relate to women. The nature of these relationships differed greatly but most were guided by the intricacy of other beliefs, where the association with the female is frequently vague and of two minds (Huang 24). They regularly perceived fruitfulness, sexuality, motherhood, arcane knowledge, and hidden powers as directly associated with the woman and assessed these elements optimistically. However, many creeds also demoted women to a mediocre position, considering them an inferior species, adulterated and negligent, and repeatedly repressing them using greater or slighter rigorousness (Tao, and Smith 189). The intricacy of women’s place is specifically distressing in the Daoist case, given that the faith is caught between its model astrophysical principle of the influence of yin and the actualities of a robustly patriarchal society complying with the Confucian ideals. In other words, astrologically Daoism perceived women as expressions of the untainted cosmic power of yin, essential for the functioning of the world, equivalent and for some philosophies, even greater than yang. Daoism furthermore connects the Dao itself, the power of design at the foundation of the heavens, to the woman and defines it as the origin of all beings. Inside the religion, there is a prevalent outlook of adoration and admiration for the feminine, revering the cosmic link in addition to the reproductive and caring nature of females (Huang 80).

Nevertheless, Daoism all through its history has always encouraged the social idea of a conventional Confucian society that was paternal, patrilineal, and patrilocal, and placed men above women. Customary Chinese culture downgraded women to the homestead and restricted them from indulging in decision-making and serious social matters. In Confucian philosophy, only male offspring were appreciated, since only sons could carry the family name and accomplish the ancestral responsibilities (Lopez 94). Girls, frequently missed from the total list of a man’s offspring, were usually handled with disrespect and disdain, considered a trouble since they would ultimately marry out and further a stranger’s lineage. They were not perceived as deserving of education, apart from domestic skills, and their menstrual cycles made them tainted and inappropriate for major duties (Huang 87). The definition of women in Confucian China was mainly through their association with men, as widows, mothers, wives, or daughters. In the Book of Rites (Liji), it was written that women had the role of “threefold obedience”. Similar sentiments were echoed in the Lienü zhuan: “A woman needs someone to depend on. While her father is alive, she is dependent on him. While her husband is alive, she is dependent on him. And while her son is alive, she is dependent on him”. Based on this model, men had full power over the destiny in addition to the activities of women, deciding on the training and handling of their daughters, able to abuse and divorce their wives freely, and rejecting widows as exiles and socially worthless. In particular, wives were simply abandoned and divorced, for reasons including infertility, vulgarity, disobedience, loquacity, theft, envy, and having a revolting disease. Many never even considered themselves as wives, as they were not lawfully married women (Huang 47).

In terms of access to economic opportunities and rights, gender and social classes played a role as well. Women from the lower classes were forced to work outside the home and this meant they had to balance the households and a second work in agriculture or business. They communicated liberally with men and were not limited to their own homes. If they wound up in the entertainment world, they would not necessarily be slaves of cruel madams, but in unique cases discovered chances to develop their artistic, musical, and literary talents in this setting. Women from the upper class likewise worked as intellectual and political instruments, not only teaching their sons but also offering counsel to their spouses and therefore, influencing decision making and social aspects. This category of women assumed responsibility not only for their husband’s lineage but also with their indigenous family, reinforcing social coalitions and creating political links (Huang 12). While their contact with males was still restricted, they had the luxury of developing women-only networks that had substantial influence in the community.

Mothers, furthermore, were the beneficiaries of the Confucian value of filial piety that demanded reverence for the mother and compliance to her desires. Not completely misogynous, Confucians recognized the significance of yin, paid respect to the sacrilege of the Earth, and admired their mothers (Lopez 89). These women were often matriarchs who controlled the household and scholars who influenced the worldview of males. Regardless of the freedom and influence, women in traditional Daoist society were typically restricted from attaining more than an allowed level of power. Social rules transformed over time in favor of women. For instance, women in the Tang dynasty were allowed to divorce men by mutual consent. Women were also allowed to own property and keep their dowry in a procedure that was backed by law. The Qing was popular for the high levels of female literacy levels that contribute greatly towards the consequent rise of female poets in imperial China. Social rejects such as widows emerged as influential agents who acted independently. They were even celebrated provided they brought pride to their husband’s clan (Huang 45).

The vast majority of women in historical China married and avoided adopting an independent lifestyle. Notwithstanding, even if a woman restricted herself to the confines of her home, it was not automatically envisaged as a constraint and limitation. There was also the aspect of a marital association that stressed the need for love, company, and collective responsibility, so that being a homemaker stood for a position of security and protection. In conclusion, the role of the woman in traditional China was very limited (Lopez 56). This situation was caused by the patriarchal society that placed the priority and focus on males. Women, including girls, were restricted to the confines of the home where they were further repressed. Women were also limited in their access to economic opportunities as well as rights.

 

Work Cited

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Huang, Shih-shan S. Picturing the True Form: Daoist Visual Culture in Traditional China. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012. Print.

Lopez, Donald S. Religions of China in Practice. Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 1996. Print.

Tao, Hongjing, and Thomas E. Smith. Declarations of the Perfected: Part One. 2013. Print.

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DRNC Scenario

DRNC Scenario

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DRNC Scenario

Introduction

The Commander of the Crime Scene Investigations Bureau is a significant posting that allows the holder to coordinate emergency responses as well as fortify the city for huge events such as the DRNC meeting. It is therefore imperative that in conjunction with the Miami Dade Police Department and other law enforcement agencies, the work group for this assignment have competent personnel with a keen eye on detail and alertness to every potential threat that could mar this event (Flaherty, Marrinan, &Zuiker, 2004). A major issue will be the availability of enough resources to cover for the duration of the occasion hence federal and local government officials in charge of finance will be instituted to assist in budgetary allocations with the aid of the DNRC representative, Ms. Cassandra Armand’s team as well. As a campaign event, the latter will chip in immensely. The designation of the meeting as a National Special Security Event is an indication that an interagency committee would be best suited to handle the arising issues.

Body

Agents under Supervisory Special Agent Samantha Salerno from the secret service will have the task to provide intelligence briefs to the committee while also providing advanced weapons search and route planning techniques to the team due to the high-level training her department is renowned. The overwhelming nature of the function will necessitate a command structure with the Secret Service at the lead although primary custody of the evidence of any crime is left to the local MDPD. As such, Mr. Horace Copeland’s officers will be instrumental in advising other members on the possible evacuation points within the city that offer the safest and fastest mode of offering treatment to victims while maintaining the normalcy of traffic for other road users. In the event of a crime, it is plausible that this could be sparked by momentary issues or rather result from planned attacks days before the meeting. Whereas the saving of life is an important aspect of the job, it will be advisable to locate a central CSI pool center to process and monitor the progress of agency activities as a way of enforcing uniformity. It is therefore vital for the processing of evidence to be done in designated hospitals within the localities under the command of the lead CSI investigator.

The overall photographer within the MDPD ranks will be available too to offer insight into the issue of lighting within the vicinities especially due to the popular trend of using smart phones to take pictures hence such behavior could interfere with the illumination. A harmonization program needs to be set up among the sketch preparers within the various task forces thereby resulting in a representative of this unit from all units at the meeting as well. This team will need to liaise with the contractors of famous landmarks within the city in order to obtain accurate measurements that aid in forensic evidence collection thereby making it necessary for a city planning official to be present (Byers & Johnson, 2009). The evidence recorders, who will be tasked with keeping custody across the different formations need to have a seamless work ethic hence their principals are relevant in the upcoming session too. As mentioned above, availability of protective gear will be necessary for these teams’ effectiveness and this reinforces the presence of the local and federal budgetary committee officials as mentioned above.

Specialists form an integral part of the CSI operations. For example, medical examiners, odontologists, bomb technicians, blood pattern analysts and criminalists comprise this category. Such individuals facilitate the forensic exercise hence will be instrumental in providing expert opinion upon occurrence of any incidents either within the DRNC arena or outside especially due to the likelihood of protestors in various parts of the city. It would be incumbent upon the different law enforcement agencies to forward their lead investigators in these matters in order to collate the approach for adoption in categorizing potential evidence. The team will thus be tasked with identifying the type of luggage permissible within certain quarters. Such precaution will be aimed at preventing the handling of deadly material by unauthorized personnel. Communication within the joint intergovernmental task force will be another crucial aspect of a successful operation hence the identification of a special frequency via a central command center will also feature.

Conclusion

            Hosting of the DRNC convention is a high-risk assignment that requires thorough preparation across multilevel agencies within the law enforcement fraternity. The CSI team is thus primed to handle a large operation that requires huge resources and manpower working in concert before, during and after the event (Allen, 2007)

. A meeting of such magnitude would therefore need the presence of specialists, photographers, medical examiners and evidence recorders from the various formations in order to plan on the evidence collection techniques for use as well as the command structure to use. While the Secret service is welcome to offer its superior expertise, the primary custodian agency will be the MDPD for easier terms of reference and its knowledge of the local terrain.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Allen, M. (2007). Reading CSI: Crime TV under the Microscope. London: I.B. Tauris.

Byers, M., & Johnson, V. M. (2009). The CSI Effect: Television, Crime, and Governance. Lanham: Lexington Books.

Flaherty, M., Marrinan, C., & Zuiker, A. E. (2004). CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. New York: Pocket Books.

 

Critique

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Critique

Chapter 3 of the book The Real World by Kerry Ferris and Jill Stein is designed specifically for the classroom context since it concentrates on the viewpoint that learners are most concerned about-their fellow students. Nearly all the chapters are dedicated to using daily events, ordinary activities, and fashionable culture to motivate students into thinking using sociological principles. The introductory sections of the chapter started with the best way to study culture. Ferris and Stein (2014) argued that it was imperative to attempt to apply cultural relativism when studying any group. This section of the chapter was effectively structured. It contained the necessary introduction that ushered in eth readers and gave them a brief summary of what to expect in the paper. A specific case is the definition of culture, as the “entire way of life for a group of people” was elaborate and self-explanatory (Ferris and Stein 7). Through the chapter, many other definitions were included to explain technical terminology. The usage of simple vocabulary and short arguments allowed the reader to understand the concepts.

In terms of structure and layout, chapter 3 was organized using a precise top-down approach. The chapter commenced with a section on “How to read this chapter” which guided the readers on the best way to gain the most from the chapter. After this, the chapter moved it the basic definition of culture. The definitions ushered in specific phenomena within culture including ethnocentrism and cultural relativism. The variation is chapter structure was kept to a minimum. After discussion on ethnocentrism, the chapter reverted to addressing other aspects of cultural variations in relationships and in the future. The use of real-life examples when discussing topics was a useful inclusion. College students and scholars regularly need to perceive the relationship between theory and practice. All the major principles were accompanied by ordinary examples from the school and home setting that could be understood by the college level students. The chapters of the book were arranged in an appealing way. The graphic design in chapter 3 used color themes extensively. Apart from color themes, the authors also included various other supplementary instruments including tables, pie charts, quote sections, and sidebars to highlight arguments, and theories. Since the chapter was discussing about social elements and sociology, the authors made liberal sue of illustrations and pictures. These illustrations improved the understanding of the issues being discussed. They also captured the attention of the students.

The presentation of the main arguments and real-life examples within chapter 3 flowed relatively easily. Ferris and Stein (2014) designed the chapter to communicate the key ideas of cultural components and change. Therefore, in their discussions, both authors addressed a large number of topics but concluded by bringing back the discussion to show its relationship with culture. Examples of topics covered included the role played by technology, social media, education, and religion in shaping culture. IN conclusion, chapter 3 of the publication The Real World covered the fundamentals of culture in an elaborate yet comprehensible way. It was also highly relevant as it contained numerous examples using the latest trends in social media, fashion, film, and education. It is a useful inclusion to the study list for students at the middle school and college level as it is easy to understand, has many illustrations and related readings that can make learning about culture interesting.

 

 

Works Cited

Top of Form

Ferris, Kerry, and Jill Stein. The Real World: An Introduction to Sociology. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc, 2014. Print.

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Mountains in Arizona

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Mountains in Arizona

QUOTES

Ayer notes, “Believed by the Hopi to be the home of their Kachina gods, the mountains are also revered in Navajo culture.”

“The Bradshaw Mountains south of Prescott were once alive with silver prospectors, and the Chiricahua Range was long-time home of the Apaches.”

PARAPHRASE

Original Material

“In the Kofa Mountains north of Yuma (good gem hunting territory) is Arizona’s only stand of native palm trees. Here, on a National Wildfire Refuge, is one of the last homes of desert bighorn sheep.

My Paraphrase

Eleanor Ayer in “Discover Arizona: The Grand Canyon State” notes the significance of different Arizona mountains by highlighting their importance as places of mining and habitation of endangered species.

Original Material

“Forming the edge of Arizona’s high plateau is the 200-mile Mogollon Rim. The rim was lifted out of a prehistoric sea and its high walls of limestone, sandstone, granite and shale today stand more than a mile above sea level. This area was the setting for many Zane Grey stories.”

My Paraphrase

The Mogollon Rim is the defining end of the high plateau and it originated from prehistoric sea. Its rock is made of different materials and it is an inspiration for many stories about the place.

SUMMARY

The highest mountains in Arizona are the San Francisco Peaks found at the north of flagstaff. Humphrey’s peak is the highest point at 12,633feet. The people consider the mountains sacred and they believe to be the home of the gods. The mountains are the last home of the native palm trees in the region and one of the last remaining habitats of the desert bighorn sheep. The mountains have been a source of inspiration for many, including authors, and they have the states largest ski resorts. They are believed to hold some minerals such as gold and silver.

COMBINATION

Original material

“The Bradshaw Mountains south of Prescott were once alive with silver prospectors, and the Chiricahua Range was long-time home of the Apaches. In the often photographed Superstition Mountains east of Phoenix is the lost gold mine of “the Dutchman” Jacob Waltz.”

My combination

According to Ayer, the mountains in Arizona were once the homes of the Native Americans. Moreover, they were known for their minerals, as they were once “alive with silver prospectors” and they were considered the “lost gold mine”.

Original material

“Within the San Francisco Peaks is the Sunset Crater, the 1,000-foot volcanic cone created by an eruption about 1068. There is also evidence of lava flow in the White Mountains, home of 11,950-foot BaldyPeak. Arizona’s largest ski resort, Apache Sunrise, is run by the WhiteMt. Apaches. Another popular ski area (the furthest south in North America) is 9,157-foot Mt.Lemmon in the Santa CatalinaMountains near Tucson

My combination

The mountain peaks are a major attraction in the region. Some of the mountains have evidence of volcanic activities. Tourism seems to be a major economic activity in the region. The local communities are heavily vested in the economic activities, as can be evidenced by the management of Apache Sunrise, which is “Arizona’s largest ski resort.”

QUOTES

Richard Brusca and Wendy Moore observe, “Situated 140 km north of the United States-Mexico border, the Santa Catalina Mountains are one of the best known sky islands”

“I continue to live under the spell of the Catalinas, their great beauty and deep mysteries, and an opportunity to learn about the ecology and natural history of the southwest.”

PARAPHRASE

Original material

According to Brusca and Moore, “On the north side of the Catalina Mountains, most grassland habitats have been converted to “scrubland” by over a century of grazing, giving the landscape a desert-like appearance.”

My paraphrase

Human activity has contributed to changing the environment and appearance of the Catalina Mountains. In the beginning, most of the region of the northern side was covered with grassland. However, humans changed the appearance when they started grazing their livestock in the region. Currently, the mountains do not resemble their past as they have more of a desert like appearance

Original material

“Higher plant diversity in the north-slope sites is likely also due to the greater variety of soil types there, including limestone soils.”

My paraphrase

The northern region contains different types of soils. Soil is important for plant growth. The north region mostly has limestone soils. Some plants use such soils to grow and they will be many in such a region

SUMMARY

The authors describe the different mountains in Arizona that qualify as sky islands. The height and the trees in the region are important in defining the place. The name of the sky islands can change depending on a persons view when looking at the mountains. Hence, the Madrean sky islands, Petran sky islands, and the cordilleran sky islands refer to much or less the same thing. The region covering the sky islands is about 45,000 sq km, 25,000 of which are in the US. The region is a meeting place between two deserts and two mountain chains. That means it has a lot of biodiversity based on the two different environments.

COMBINATION

Original material

“This great cordillera, sometimes called the spine of North America continent, has but one break, a low saddle called the cordilleran gap between the rocky mountains/Colorado plateau and the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico. This low-elevation gap is a biogeographic barrier between the high-elevation, temperate and tropical montane biotas of the cordillera.”

My combination

The cordillera is a vast region in terms of its size as well as the natural diversity. The region is referred to as the “spine of North America, mostly because of its position. The different natural environment in the region not only adds to the biodiversity, but it is also considered as a “biogeographic barrier” between the desert and the mountain areas.

Original material

“A mountain range in this region is defined as a sky island if it is high enough to rise above the valley floors of desert scrub or desert grassland. Should they rise above those communities, they will host oak habitats, and if they rise high enough they will also have pine forests and even mixed conifer forests with firs and spruces (a subalpine plant community).”

My combination

The height of the mountain ranges in the region determines their definition. The ranges that are higher than the “valley floors of desert scrubs or desert grassland” are referred to as sky islands. The height of the mountains also determines the trees and vegetation that are abundant in the region.

QUOTES

Fulton Williams notes that “Perishable materials are seldom found in a good state of preservation in open sites and must be sought in places from undue weathering”

“The value of the discoveries lies not so much in the quantity of specimens or any individually unusual features among them, but in the coexistence of the several items.”

PARAPHRASE

Original material

According to Williams, “As the Winchester Mountains and the valley to the south are still in an area primarily important for wild game and grazing rather than agriculture, and as the preponderance of material recovered consists of bows and arrows, it is more than possible that here was a repository for offerings to deities of the chase and hunt.”

My paraphrase

The main activity that people participated in during prehistoric times was hunting and keeping of animals. This was evidenced by the unsuitability of the land for agriculture as well as an abundance of game in the region. Moreover, the tools found in the caves were associated with hunting.

Original material

“It is probable that the cave was occupied to a limited extent by a people predating those whose artifacts were found at the surface level. This seems indicated by the ash residue of many fires, crude manos and metates, and chipped stone…”

My paraphrase

The caves contained evidence showing the tools that the people used. By analyzing some of these tools, it is likely that another group of people lived in the caves for a short while.

SUMMARY

The author describes one of the most profound features of Winchester Mountains. The caves are a treasure full of history and they can help people to understand some elements about their past. The seclusion and isolation of the mountains was convenient for those seeking shelter and refuge. The caves contain a lot of evidence showing the kind of lifestyle that the people led

COMBINATION

Original material

“In the recent past bat droppings have been collected by guano hunters and it is probable that these were the first people, other than those of prehistoric times, to have used the cave for any definite purpose. While it is quite possible that the Apache Indians may have employed the cave as a camp site, there is no direct evidence of their having established it as a permanent abode.”

My combination

Other than people living in the prehistoric times, the guano hunters were some of the early inhabitants of the caves. The hunters used the caves for different purposes. The Apache Indians may have frequented the caves but “there is no direct evidence” that they lived in the caves permanently.

Original material

“This seems indicated by the ash residue of many fires, crude manos and metates, and chipped stone—all found below surface level and unquestionably of earlier origin than the perishable material.”

My combination

The presence of different tools and other forms of evidence including “many fires, crude manos and metates, and chipped stone” show that the people who lived in the caves might have lived there in prehistoric times because the tools were found below the surface level

QUOTES

When describing the beauty of some of the natural features in Arizona, John Annerino observed, “It was a mountain wholly detached from the earth-a magic pillar of granite riding high above dark and angry clouds”

“So this is where God put the West”

PARAPHRASE

Original material

Annerino noted, “Far in indeterminate distance lay the outlines of the mountains. Always they seemed to recede. The plain all but invisible, the wagon trail quite so, the depths of space-these flung heavy on the soul their weight of mysticism”

My paraphrase

 

Original material

“Off in the distance, as everywhere in this desert land, rose the arid mountains, all rock and angles sparsely grown with brush, floating under cloud shadows, dappled with sunlight, colored by superstition and legend”

My paraphrase

SUMMARY

The author describes the beauty of the different physical natural elements found in Arizona. He is awed by the beauty of nature, as he seeks to show how the different features stand out and yet seem to converge when it is convenient. His main form of expression is photography and he includes the sentiments of different people who seem to share his awe as they gaze upon the beauty in Arizona.

COMBINATION

Original material

“It was a mountain wholly detached from the earth-a magic pillar of granite riding high above dark and angry clouds. Lightning briefly played around its base; and then it vanished as quickly as it appeared.”

My combination

The mountain seemed to stand in isolation as it towered above everything else. It was as if it was “wholly detached from the earth” as it stood out in the horizon. It seemed to cover and hide everything that would seem to distract others from viewing it, including the lightning, which only appeared for a moment.

Original material

To my surprise and wonder, I discovered that Arizona and the great southwest offered an immense and diverse landscape of mountain islands that towered high above desert seas…”

My combination

The author was surprised by the vast vegetation and beauty in Arizona. He observes the “immense and diverse landscape” which was present in mountains and the desert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Angry Men

Twelve Angry Men

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Twelve Angry Men

Part 1

The film “Twelve Angry Men” is a 1957 American drama film set up in a courthouse. It revolves around 12 members of a jury in a murder trial. A young boy is accused of stabbing and killing his father, and there are witnesses who can attest to that. A seemingly tired judge leaves the jury with that task to deliberate on the whether the boy is guilty of murder or not. However, he states that if the verdict is guilty, the boy stands to be sentenced to death. The plot unfolds slowly as the jurors engage in heated deliberations on the case. Initially, juror 8 is the only juror, who considers the boy innocent, as he feels that the boy’s guilt has reasonable doubt. This is met by stern opposition from the other jurors who seemingly have other activities they have to attend to later on. However, a secret ballot reveals one of the jurors has changed their vote to “not guilty”. The other jurors are angered by these, and further heated discussions ensue. The jurors slowly start changing their votes to “not guilty”. Eventually, they come to a consensus and agree to a unanimous “not guilty vote”. This movie essentially tackles the issue of consensus building among other issues.

One of the most outstanding elements of this movie is ethical thinking. In the scene where juror 8 is asking the other jurors to take some time and analyze the case, he appears to be an individual who is thorough and analytical when it comes to making decisions. He believes that there is reasonable doubt in the boy’s guilt and tries to convince the other jurors so. It is at this point that while viewing the film, it was easy to recognize the theme in play in this scene. Ethical thinking is important, as juror 8 was subconsciously implying during the entire debate. The other jurors’ lines of thought are clearly portrayed in their utterances and reasoning basis.

The subsequent scenes captured my attention because as the events unfolded, the essence of ethical thinking came into play. For instance, one of the jurors, Juror 3, identified as Lee Jacob, had this preconceived notion that people from the slum are reckless in life and are nothing but criminals. His outburst directed to juror 5, after the new not guilty vote clearly indicates that he is biased against slum dwellers and is thus bent on finding him guilty without giving him much thought. One of the jurors, juror 7, is pressed about going to the baseball game later on, and is visibly unwilling to engage in further deliberations about the case, in order to wrap up the meetings (Lumet, Fonda, Rose, Cobb, Begley, Marshall, &Warden, 2001). According to ethical thinking and decision making, having such an approach towards a problem is redundant and ineffective. The approach taken by these jurors is misleading and unethical because they are basing their opinions on personal issues, which have no ethical, ground. From a personal perspective, the jurors who insist on declaring the teenage boy as guilty without deliberations should have initially taken an ethical decision making approach to solve the problem.

I think that in that scenario, the jurors, especially juror 3, who evidently was keen on ensuring the boy received a death sentence, should have evaluated the problem first, and weighed in on the options without making decisions hinged on personal experiences with his son. Ethical thinking requires one to evaluate the alternatives in the particular scenario, identify the moral expectations, legal requirements and values, and finally identifies the courses of action and the support available for the issue. For instance, juror 3 should have put side his personal issues with his own son, and handled the matter objectively, instead of being dramatic in the courthouse during the heated discussions. His behavior goes to show that if alone, he would easily and gladly declared the boy as guilty without considering the moral and ethical considerations that go in to a jury verdict. Ethical thinking should not only be applied to jury situations, but throughout life. As seen in the film, it is easy for an individual to take on a very biased position in a situation because of very biased personal reasons that have probably been drawn from bad experiences in the past. I think that it is unfair for the other party because the outcome adversely affects them, without having their side of the story heard. The film provides a new learning experience in that ethical thinking is important as the outcome may sometimes determine whether a person will live or not.

The learning experience drawn from this film provides an excellent platform upon which my personal perspectives about various situations will be in future influenced by ethical thinking. In the film, the jurors eventually reach a unanimous decision, after subconsciously overlooking their personal reservations and critically analyzing the reasonable doubt in the teenage boy’s guilt. Drawing from this example, I believe I will be able to evaluate critically both personal and professional situation in an ethical manner before making any decisions. Earlier on before watching this movie, my decisions were base on the face value of a situation, because of the perception that critical thinking is exhausting and time consuming. However, the experience in the movie has many values to emulate, which I believe will not only improve my ethics, but my social skills as well.

Part 2

Clip 1

During the jury’s deliberations, Juror 3, Lee Cobb, sharply criticizes juror number 5, Jack Klugman for switching his guilty vote to a not guilty vote. He accuses him of doing so because he grew up in a slum and he has this innate sympathy for slum children despite the crimes they have committed (Lumet et al., 2001). However, it turns out to be juror 9 who switched his vote. This act alone reveals that juror 3 is has a high level of implicit prejudice against slum children. Implicit prejudice emanates from the stereotypes people form about others and thus subconsciously make decisions based upon this (Nelson, 2009). Later on, we discover that this stereotype coupled with his strained relationship with his son is the reason for the irrational behavior in the courthouse.

Clip 2

During the deliberations, juror 8 asks juror 4 if he wears his glasses while sleeping. This question has a rather obvious answer as he is trying to prove a point to the team. Juror 4 is for the idea that the boy is guilty; however, juror 8 criticizes his approach to the situation. Juror 4 had earlier mentioned that he finds the boy guilty because the woman from across the street saw him stab the old man. What juror 4 does is engaging in constructive and cognitive conflict, where he criticizes his ideas in order to make his point known. Eventually, juror 4 agrees that it is possible the woman did not see the boy stabbed his father and he switches his vote.

Clip 3

The jury consists of various characters who take up various standpoints in the matter at hand. Therefore, there are different takes and perspectives on the verdicts each juror has. For instance, juror 7 and juror 10 are keen on declaring the boy guilty. This is because they are taking on an intuitive thinking approach instead of being rational. Juror 7 has a game to attend to later on and is therefore not keen on focusing on the details of the case. Juror 10 believes that all slum dwellers are wild and dangerous, and thus is not concerned with examining the variables in the case. This scene is an example of the intuitive thinking process amongst the jurors.

Clip 4

The film is based on heated deliberations about the boys’ verdict. Juror 8 is responsible for initiating the heated debates where the other jurors eventually begin to think critically about the case. Through this critical thinking, the entire jury is able to reach a unanimous decision based on ethical reasons.

Clip 5

In the scene where juror 3 provides and argument as to why the buy is guilty, it is evident that the juror is basing his decision on overconfidence. His beliefs are hinged on his nasty relationship with his son, which changes his perception about people. Evidently, this instills overconfidence in him such that he is sure that the boy is guilty. Such overconfidence bias often clouds judgment and the decision making process.

 

References

Lumet, S., Fonda, H., Rose, R., Cobb, L. J., Begley, E., Marshall, E. G., Warden, J. MGM Home Entertainment Inc. (2001). 12 angry men. Santa Monica, CA: MGM Home Entertainment Inc.

Nelson, T. (2009). Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination. New York: Psychology Press.

 

 

 

 

Human Resource Systems

Human Resource Systems

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Institution:

 

Human Resource Systems

Question 1

Software as service programs for small businesses has recently become a very important part of the business operations. Most companies have adopted such services especially in the Human Resource departments. Cloud-based computing is one of the most popular methods of providing IT services for companies and has been adopted by various companies that provide software as service. Examples of such companies are the Workday Inc, and SAP SE. the two rivals are one of the world’s largest software providers for both large and small companies. Workday software has been known to provide fully integrated SAAS solutions to their clients. It has slow to start and a self-service feature, which is quite convenient for the client. Its user interface is friendly and remains unrivalled in the industry, and is at the forefront with innovation, with three releases annually. Despite having these marvelous features, Workday has been outdone by SAP for various reasons. SAP software is better for small businesses because it has the most robust business intelligent software, which has a configurable dashboard, with data mining and warehousing features. Additionally, it has an impressive network of clients and has the best enterprise information security. For these reasons, SAP software is the best option for a small company.

Question 2

It is important to use cloud based data integration when migrating from any system. This is because cloud based integrations are likely to be more comprehensive than other traditional systems. Therefore, if a company were migrating from its legacy systems to an eHR solution, it would be better to use cloud based integration software. This is because such software is resourceful in terms of synchronizing data, ensuring high data quality and replication. Therefore, if the data quality is excellent and the replication is done right, then the end users who are mostly job seekers would not experience some of the problems associated with recruitment portals. Data replication in cloud-based integration incorporates compliance in its application.

Question 3

The human resource industry is one f the industries that are largely affected by the economic and demographic variables. For instance, if there are negative economic changes, most human resource departments in companies tend to reorganize their budgets, and cut out on elements such as training and development, decrease their budget for the recruitment processes. This may negatively affect a business. Additionally, changes in the population require the human resource departments to review their strategies. For instance, an increase in the labor providing population implies that a higher number of employees have to be employed, but at a lower wage in order to meet the economic demands of a nation.

Some of the changes that could occur in the HR industry are the removal of training as a HR obligation and having a separate body track the performance of an employee. For instance, if the government signed into law that employees must seek job training outside the organization, the organization would have to re-evaluate its HRIS in order to cross out one of the system needs, which is to generate provisions for employee training. Such a change in the HRIS would be essential in order to ensure the HRIS does not have redundant features.

Question 4

For a future company payroll’s system, it will be better to use payroll software because it will provide efficiency and will be cost effective. Once an employee is in the payroll system, the software will be able to deduct taxes and other reduction, fill in then required forms on behalf of the employee, calculate gross and net pay, send electronic payments to the authorities. The process will begin with filling out and sending out the required forms to the federal government and local authorities, and calculate and deduct taxes and other remittances. However, to improve the system, the company will use software that help track the number of hours an employee has worked in order to ensure payments for overtime are done appropriately.

 

United Healthcare

United Healthcare

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Institution:

 

United Healthcare

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services anticipates enhancing service delivery to its clients in relation the National Quality Strategy. The focus is on delivery of enhanced care, ensuring the presence of health communities and delivery of affordable care to the public. In response to the Affordable Care Act, the entity has instituted a variety of reforms in terms of adoption of new policies, standards, and regulations aimed at meeting the expectations of customers, governmental agencies, financial institutions and the healthcare facilities in the country. The United States can be termed as a global leader in the field of healthcare due to the presence of rigid institutions, healthcare professionals and an extensive variety of healthcare providers.

In recent years, the United States has witnessed an increase in healthcare expenditure than any other economy around the world (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2013). It is estimated that by the year 2020, the healthcare expenditure in the United States will reach an estimated $4.6trillion and account for nearly 20% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 2013). The healthcare costs of any country are usually an underlying reflection of the overall health of a population. The institution of the Affordable Care has been effective in enhancing the functionality of private health insurance and extending access to healthcare services for low income Americans. This has altered the means that services are paid through programs such as Medicaid and Medicare.

Improving access and delivery of quality, reduction of costs and coordination of care are primary strategic objectives of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) as well as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). polices adopted through the ACA such the establishment of Accountable Care Organizations has enhanced value based purchases and coordination of care for individuals utilizing services provided in both Medicaid and Medicare. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) plays a critical role in the delivery of healthcare services by ensuring access to quality care. This has been made possible by new regulations and policies by expanding the responsibilities and duties beyond the traditional role of administration of CHIP, Medicaid, and Medicare programs (Flower, 2012).

The Affordable Care Act demands the CMS coordinates with the states towards establishment of Health Insurance Marketplaces, expansion of services such as Medicaid and regulating the private health insurance plans availed (Muennig & Glied, 2010). The entity anticipates that the expanded role and responsibility provided by the ACA will place CMS at the forefront of leading the delivery of high quality care and enhancing healthcare delivery at affordable costs for all Americans. The expansion of the duties and responsibilities will affect CMS’ growth in its traditional base and provide emphasis on continued efforts towards enchained innovation, reduction of disparities in access to healthcare and enhancing integrity of the program. In addition, this is anticipated to expand the networks and confer additional responsibilities for healthcare professionals such as nursing staff and physicians.

Integration of Insurance Oversight and Center for Consumer Information into CMS will increase the duties and responsibilities of the entity towards consumer protection concerning private healthcare insurance and enabling market reforms (Vincent & Velkoff, 2010). The entity also shares a critical responsibility with other state agencies in promotion of use and adoption of health information technology as a means of enabling optimal delivery of quality care for all Americans in the country. The entity will continue in leveraging its internal resources and its external relations with partners to remain steadfast towards achieving its mission of being an efficacious steward of public funds and resources.

The entity envisions success in the future as relative to ensuring the presence of high quality healthcare system in the country that provides for enhanced care and access to improved health through coverage. The focus is primarily on improving care and the health of the American population through transformation of the United States healthcare system. This is anticipated to move the system towards a system that is inherently accountable and integrated for continuous improvement of care, reduction, and elimination of unnecessary costs and providing preventive care for health promotion (Vincent & Velkoff, 2010).

CMS has identified four critical strategic goals, which it anticipates to utilize to achieve its vision and mission for the healthcare system in the United States. The identified strategic goals are applicable to all functions and programs in the organization. These strategic goals are provided as:

  1. Better care and reduced costs of access
  2. Prevention care and optimal population health
  • Expansion of healthcare coverage
  1. Achievement of enterprise excellence through development of its workforce and utilization of innovative tools processes and strategies for efficient and effective collaboration with agents and partners

As the entity moves towards developing capacity and capabilities for strategic planning and performance management, it is expected to enrich its operational and policy decisions to achieve such goals (Flower, 2012). The entity notes of the need to undertake continuous improvement in its processes as a means of achieving the strategic goals and objectives, the mission and vision. Additionally, this will also cover the alignment of internal operations to respond to new challenges and demands. Furthermore, this will enable the entity to leverage its resources as a means of reduction of incidences of redundancy and wastage. Other anticipated goals include improvement and management of client information and promotion of diversity and a culture of multifunction collaboration and cooperation in the organization.

Improvement in preventive health benefits will focus on the utilization of evidence base practice in preventive services as well as delivery of primary care (Flower, 2012). This will affirm the importance of utilization of evidence based practice for both physicians and nursing practitioners in American healthcare settings. In addition, the emphasis on preventive care will demand that healthcare professionals focusing on improving their skills, knowledge and capacities for delivering care and familiarizing themselves with new rules, policies and regulations provided under the Affordable Care Act.

Healthcare professionals, stakeholders in the healthcare sector will also be mandated to ensure that they contribute towards reduction of disparities in access and utilization of preventive and primary care benefits, enhancing outreach, and access and quality of community based services (Flower, 2012). Enhancing protectionist measures for consumers in the country will focus on the need to develop sustainable partnerships with consumers, issuers, communities, and state based agencies tasked with oversight of the insurance segment. Protectionist measures will play a critical role in the private marketplace towards enhancing transparency on the business operations of insurance providers and enhancing accountability for cost savings for the users. Moreover, this is anticipated to contribute towards high levels of integrity in the program through adoption of appropriate ethical and corporate governance measures. Integrity will be affirmed through appropriate enrollment practices, allocation, and utilization of resources in the organization for optimal delivery of care to all Americans irrespective of race, gender, ethnicity, social status, and sexual orientation.

References

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. (2013). CMS Strategy: The Road Froward 2013-2017. New York: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Flower, J. (2012). Healthcare beyond reform: Doing it right for half the cost. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press/Taylor & Francis.

Muennig, P.A., & Glied, S.A. (2010). What changes in survival rates tell us about US health care. Health Affairs, 29(11):2105-2113.

Vincent, G.K. & Velkoff, V.A., (2010). The Next Four Decades: The Older Population in the United States: 2010 to 2050. Washington D.C: Census Bureau.

 

 

 

 

Education System

Name:

Tutor:

Course:

Date:

Education System

Question 2. Freire talks about “transformation”, or change, many times in his article. What should be changed, in Freire’s view, and how can his problem-posing version of education bring about this change?

The article by Paulo Freire presents information pertaining to the traditional education system. Additionally, it also describes the critical analysis of this system and the much-needed changes that should be enacted as means of improving education delivery. The author elucidates on the banking concept of the education system. According to him, because the teacher plays the role of depositor and the students are the depositees, there is lack of communication or interaction between the two entities. With this in mind, the author proposes the adoption of the Raison d’detre that is practiced in the Librarian education system. This form of education solves the contradiction present within the teacher-student hence creates a simultaneous alternating phases of a teacher and student roles which are intertwined. Ultimately, the aspect that needs to be changed in terms of the education system is the mythicizing of reality, which is not transparent as it conceals some vital truths that should be known by the students. The solution presented by the author is adoption of problem-posing education.

Several aspects about problem-posing education present it as a more effective teaching model. Firstly, it provides affirmation to the students. This done through creating awareness of themselves where they are aware that being in the process of becoming uncompleted and unfinished beings. This realization is affirmed by their belief that humans are different from animals through their incomplete nature that should be emphasized by education. Secondly, there is the aspect of demythologizing reality as depicted by banking education. This is achieved through encouraging dialogue within the class setting. This drives the students to be communicative and improve their cognitive ability of reality and its dynamics. In conclusion, the problem-posing education is considered more effectual by the author owing to the actualization of reality, encouraging communication and cognition as well as establishing an affirmative environment for the students.

MORLEY PAPER

MORLEY PAPER

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Course:

Date:

 

 

 

 

Morley Paper

Morley’s study of the historic preservation in cities such as Seattle, Denver and Albuquerque is marked by the use of third rate historical ideologies which have been critical in providing support to first rate urban development in western united states  both 20th and 21st centuries. She affirms in her discussion that indeed identity is a created concept. This is illustrative that historical preservation practices are times flexible and overly erroneous in providing an understanding of the past. She suggests that as opposed to evaluation of a given historic district in comparing it a historical antecedent, it is critical to undertake the evaluation of the district based on the individual choices of developers, planners, and local officials present during periods such as the 1950s and 1960s.

The understanding that preservation is based on social constructed pasts of a community is not a new concept. The idea of imaginative reconstruction in the American West as used by Morley is drawn from previous works such as John M. Findlay in the works Magic Lands: Western Cityscapes and American Culture After 1940 (1992)[1]. This work covered the idealization of American Western history from an urban context. On the other hand, Morley provides an effective and deeply researched study of the role of planning historians, planners and western historians to provide lessons on the imaginative reconstruction that took place in the American West.

Morley’s work is effective in brining the audience closer to the reconstructions of American cities that grew because of postwar incentives that induced clearance and reconstruction. Clearance and renewal in American cities played a critical role in reversion of trends for a number of urban neighborhoods. She notes that these historical neighborhoods were able to gain public recognition by garnering support at the grass-root level leading to development by city officials on areas, which were originally dismissed by overly cautious real estate developers and city planners.

Morley also notes that preservation of these historic cities and neighborhoods in the country can be simply termed as a paradox, saving these buildings and structures while defying change of reconstruction, which brought these buildings in the first instance. Her studies renew these paradoxes with a specific reference on the mythologies and histories of the West. For instance, in Albuquerque’s Old Town, that was annexed by the white community, despite overwhelming reluctance from the Hispanic community, who primarily intent on utilization the heritage of the city was reconstructed and redecorated in a manner that was only befitting for Santa Fe during the 1930s, rather than Albuquerque in the 1890s.

Little is learned from the implementation of the housing and renewal acts implemented in the years 1949 and 1954 respectively as well as the subsequent shift towards neighborhood-based community development funding and the application of Tax reforms undertaken in the year 1976[2]. It is important to note that cities generally have amorphous boundaries and definitions, whereas the basic tent of identity is core to their respective formations. In essence, the members of an imagined community, such as the populations in the cities identified by Morley, do not know each other personally, yet the share a similar sense of communion due to shared values, beliefs, attitudes, and ideologies.

It can be understood the reconstruction of these cities by new populations was driven by the need to develop and reaffirm a sense of identity. Outside communities usually ply a role in the development of distinctive perceptions about a particular society. In addition, the perceptions of the outsiders usually permeate into the specific society and affect the definition and identity of the community. This is noted in communities such as Albuquerque in the 1890s that was transformed by the white settlers who redeveloped and transformed to meet their respective needs. It can also be argued that the choices of the population usually play a critical role in definition and construction of the political geography through manipulation and subsequent development of identity. This provides an elaborate overview of the evolution of communities and cities such as Seattle, Denver, and Albuquerque in the west that were transformed by the presence of new settlers, with minimal consideration of the historical relevance of these areas for the native communities.

Essentially, political and geographical boundaries are developed by human beings and more so by entities that are not native to a given community. A majority of the developments in the American West can be attributed to the white communities who are not natives of these areas, but rather sought to claim them as their own[3]. Historical districts can be termed as primary examples of the man-made geography and its overall role effect on an imagined community. Government actors such as planners and politicians usually develop boundaries in respect to various factors such as importance of different historical evens and the inherent traits of identified architecture.

The development of boundaries of these historic districts or neighborhoods on the identified factors fails to consider the definition utilized by a community individually and understanding of its self-identity. For instance, Morley notes that in annexing Albuquerque’s Old Town, the white community failed to tae into consideration the existing definition and identity developed by the Hispanic community for this area. Subsequently, the practice of historic districting the United States renders ordinal or native communities enclosed by unfamiliar boundaries, which fail to take into consideration prior values, attitudes, and cultural definitions of existing boundaries.

Researchers have argued the development of historic districts have been effective in establishment of stability and originality in hectic cities. In addition, the sense of communal identity that is accruable from the use of legislation may not be compatible with the realities and expectations of the native communities in these historic districts. The historic district may opt to promote a single conception or identity of one community over the other, resulting in the distortion of the inherent identity and communal definition within the community as well as how the outside world defines such a community. Morley also noted that the geographic neighbors within these historic districts may share minimal values and attitudes with the emergent identity, yet through the restriction of the historic district they may be bound together and influence the identities of each other[4].

The validation of the various zoning regulations and policies by the United States Supreme Court enabled the city governments in the United States to use this as a platform for controlling the basic aesthetic features within the neighborhoods and creating historic districts. This practice was initiated because of the desire by the public to save buildings, which initially served critical needs of the public. For instance, the historical relevance of the Old State House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was the staring posing of the development of historical districts, given the building served as the venue for the constitutional Convention, which gave birth to the American constitution. Thus, it is important to note that these historical districts play an important role in affirmation of the identities of new communities, with minimal consideration for old values and attitudes held by the native populations. It has been argued that the reconstruction and development of historic districts was because of the need to protect the welfare of the public in the cities. This would ensure that the future generations are able to understand the origin and more so the historical value of the various areas in urban communities in the United States.

The desire to preserve structures due to the appearance is critical towards ensuring the presence of beauty in the communities. Thus, it is apparent that cities are able to develop historic preservation regulations and policies with an aim of protecting the old districts for the basic reason the old styles of such structures appeals to the aesthetic values and tastes of the local communities. This was affirmed by the enactment of the National Historic Preservation Act by the federal government that provides the government with a role in the historic preservation critical areas in the local communities.

This act is responsible for the establishment of the National Register of Historic Places, which is maintained by the country’s Secretary of the Interior. In addition, despite the declaration provided by the federal involvement in undertaking historical preservation, a large part of the decision-making lies with the local communities tasked with selection of preferable areas for preservation[5]. A majority of these areas listed within the National Register are of critical local significance given that they appeal to values of the citizens and more so the historical relevance of these areas.

Morley provides an effective and appropriate discussion on the importance of ensuring sustenance of historical districts in the country as she uses the America’s West as an example of the relevance of these areas. On the other hand, it is evident that there is minimal consideration of the preferences of the native communities given that majorities of these historical regions were redeveloped by white settlers as in the case of areas such as Seattle, Denver, and Albuquerque. However, imaginative reconstruction is effective as it ensures that the aesthetic appeal of these historical areas is affirmed and protected for enjoyment by the local communities.

 

Bibliography

Morley, Judy Mattivi. Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006.

 

[1] Judy Mattivi Morley, Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006) 28.

 

[2] Judy Mattivi Morley, Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006) 28.

 

[3] Judy Mattivi Morley, Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006) 28.

 

[4] Judy Mattivi Morley, Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006) 28.

 

[5] Judy Mattivi Morley, Historic Preservation & the Imagined West: Albuquerque, Denver, & Seattle (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006) 28.