Doctor of Pharmacy

Doctor of Pharmacy

Student’s Name

Institutional Affiliation

Doctor of Pharmacy

The Doctor of Pharmacy allows people to pursue a career as a pharmacist. Before becoming a pharmacist, practitioners are required to sit for a licensure examination based on the requirements in their country. The degree represents an elevated sense of responsibility that the practitioner possesses within the healthcare system. The professional program requires applicants to engage in pre-professional coursework for three years. Practitioners must also complete the degree in four academic years. Individuals take approximately eight years to complete all examinations and acquire certification to practice pharmacy. Such medical experts are required within healthcare institutions and the local environment if the sector is to achieve its vision of health and well-being. Different people pursue the degree for various reasons. While the compensation offered in multiple countries may attract some applicants, others possess an undying desire for research and development based on the chemistry involved. A career in pharmacy is enjoyable and ensures that people attain a healthy lifestyle.

A person would choose a career in the pharmaceutical field because of the state of flexibility in its schedule. The occupation encourages the identification of a steady plan that will ensure that the achievement of a work-life balance. Other careers within a similar supply chain or emerging medicine often require practitioners to keep long, odd, and inflexible hours limiting their ability to pursue a work-life balance program or activity (Boyce & Lawson, 2009). The doctorate allows pharmacists to work in full or part-time positions with allowances for weekends. In some clinical settings, pharmacists may work overtime to complete filling prescriptions. However, this aspect does not affect their scheduling capabilities compared to practitioners who work in a research lab.

The doctorate in pharmacy encourages career development. Different disciplines allow practitioners to pursue the next step, which implies taking the necessary lessons and sitting for examinations to acquire certification. The opportunities for growth also contribute to the enrollment of more practitioners. The demand for research pharmacists is set to rise by 2022, creating an avenue for investment (Boyce & Lawson, 2009). For instance, the prevention and cure of ailments, discovery of contemporary medications, and extrapolation of the link between food, medicine, and genetics require advanced study. Such allowances expose a pharmacist to a myriad of experiences imparting them with professional and social skills that will offer them a competitive advantage.

The degree also offers sufficient compensation to practitioners. Different practitioners pursue various disciplines that necessitate these monetary rewards. Reports issued in multiple practitioner magazines identify that the average salary of a pharmacist is 116,700 dollars. However, this is contingent on the country of operation and the employer. The average income that pharmacists attain in other countries is more than the pay offered to practitioners in the United States. According to Boyce and Lawson (2009), pharmaceutical and manufacturing practitians receive an annual income of 124,480 dollars. However, most practitioners experience current loan debts limiting the uses of such compensations. Graduates start earning immediately after acquiring certification. In this respect, attractive salaries and safe working conditions comprise factors that influence people to pursue a Doctor of Pharmacy degree.

The courses employ differentiated modes of instruction. Institutions have accommodated the presence of information technology in learning by investing in online education. A person may pursue a doctorate in pharmacy because teaching may occur through electronic platforms. Additionally, the course possesses numerous online resources that facilitate interaction and connection with other practitioners. Learning is a process that may require people to evaluate credible and available information on the internet. Doctor of Pharmacy courses require practitioners to locate data and maintain an updated copy of the pharmaceutical field (Boyce & Lawson, 2009). Organizations such as the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists possess a robust online presence that aspiring participants can exploit. Furthermore, pharmaceutical information has its foundation on evaluated and affirmed evidence that allows practitioners to access relevant material.

Some people may pursue the doctorate in Pharmacy because they value patient interaction. One of the advantages of being a pharmacist is that a person has access to people from different lifestyles. Having direct access to patients ensures that they understand the uses and methods of application for different medications. Medication education among patients is possible with increased interaction that leads to overall health and well-being (Boyce & Lawson, 2009). Satisfaction in the recovery of patients may be one of the driving factors of pursuing the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Additionally, it exempts practitioners from gore, a concept that is present in other disciplinary courses and careers. The Doctor of Pharmacy course prepares a practitioner to deal with minor health issues limiting their experience of horrifying sights.

The Doctor of Pharmacy degree creates an avenue for the emergence of pharmacists, who are respected people in different societies. The profession ensures that practitioners possess certifications that affirm their role in assisting people to stay healthy. Pharmacists maintain a significant level of responsibility to patients. The qualification also strengthens the relationships between the institutions and the community. This association is applicable in locations that possess a pharmacy making it easier to deliver quality services.

References

Boyce, E. G., & Lawson, L. A. (2009). Pre-professional curriculum in preparation for doctor of pharmacy educational programs. American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 73(8), 155.